Home / Health A-Z / Adult ADHD / ADHD in Childhood May Raise Risk for Obesity in Adulthood
ADHA in Children
Child suffering from ADHD

ADHD in Childhood May Raise Risk for Obesity in Adulthood

Boys who are diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in Childhood) are twice as likely to become obese adults as those who didn't have the disorder when they were young, a new 30-year study shows. Researchers found that men with childhood ADHD tended to have a higher body-mass index (BMI) and obesity, even if they no longer had symptoms of the disorder. Socioeconomics made no difference; well-off or poor, they tended toward obesity. The bottom line is, boys who were hyperactive when followed up for more than 30 years turned out to be more likely to be obese than comparable kids…

Review Overview

User Rating: Be the first one !

Boys who are diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in Childhood) are twice as likely to become obese adults as those who didn’t have the disorder when they were young, a new 30-year study shows. Researchers found that men with childhood ADHD tended to have a higher body-mass index (BMI) and obesity, even if they no longer had symptoms of the disorder. Socioeconomics made no difference; well-off or poor, they tended toward obesity.

The bottom line is, boys who were hyperactive when followed up for more than 30 years turned out to be more likely to be obese than comparable kids from their same communities, and that is something that really seems to be reflective of their early hyperactivity. It doesn’t matter what their current diagnosis is so much, because those are longstanding issues that likely arose in early adolescence.

A lack of impulse control and poor planning skills, symptoms often associated with ADHD, could lead to poor eating habits and food choices as well as the tendency to overeat, the study authors speculated.

It fits with other studies, and suggests that the inability to control one’s impulses, the tendency to be relatively reward-driven, may represent a risk of obesity over time.

The study, published online May 20 and in the June print issue of Pediatrics, tracked 111 men diagnosed with childhood hyperactivity, touching base with them at ages 18, 25 and 41. By adulthood, 41 percent had become obese, compared with a non-hyperactive control group that had a 22 percent obesity rate.

The results are somewhat confounding, Castellanos said, one of the representatives there.

“The pattern of results to a certain extent was counterintuitive,” he said. “We thought we would get the strongest effect in those men who manifested ADHD as adults, and that wasn’t the case. That suggests that it’s not something that is very tightly related to the current diagnosis, but the tendency to have the diagnosis.”

The findings run counter to an earlier study that showed that hyperactive adult men had a greater tendency for obesity than men who left childhood ADHD behind, said Dr. Craig Surman, scientific coordinator for the Adult ADHD Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

“So, the simple story here would be we don’t know, because you have to replicate studies to know,” he said. “The question now becomes why the findings are different.”

Future research also needs to consider whether women with childhood ADHD are as likely as men with childhood ADHD to become obese, and whether controlling hyperactivity through the use of medication can have an impact, Surman said.

The link between ADHD and obesity has become a topic of great interest as elevated rates of obesity have been reported in children with the disorder,  and obesity can lead to heart disease and diabetes later in life.

Hence, it’s very important to understand the ways ADHD affects life and self-care as we’ve known for some time that it’s not just people’s desks and houses that are messy. For some people, it’s a lack of ability to control how to care for themselves as well.

About Mehrooz Ahmed

Mehrooz Ahmed is a Health enthusiast who has devoted his life to bring a change in the lifestyle of people across the globe. For this very reason, he has created the website www.GoodHealthyWorld.com where he does blogging every day.

11 comments

  1. I do not even know how I stopped up here, however I thought this publish was once good. I don’t know who you might be but certainly you’re going to a well-known blogger if you happen to aren’t already. God bless you for such great articles on health conditions esp. like the ADHD ones.
    Cheers!

  2. very good would not have though ADHD can impact obesity

  3. my baby is suffering from aDHD. but he is not obese and hope he continues this way.

  4. nice post on ADHD. must say you have good content on ADHD good healthy world.

  5. is there any way to handle it better?

  6. did not knew that they were directly related.

  7. Good piece of advises and methods mentioned in your ADHD parenting post.

  8. I pray that Lord save us and our children from such condition. Its too painful

  9. Its quite a revelation. Hope people can seriously consider having their kids checked for this condition.

  10. Today, I went to the beach front with my kids. I found a sea shell
    and gave it to my 4 year old daughter and said “You can hear the ocean if you put this to your ear.” She put the shell to her ear and screamed.

    There was a hermit crab inside and it pinched her ear.
    She never wants to go back! LoL I know this is completely off topic but I had to tell someone!

  11. Châteaux Triche

    Thanks to these tips, you should be better be able to cope with this disorder

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*